Sunday, September 23, 2007

The Merchandise: Part One

Getting a surprise in the mail is certainly among Life's Simple Pleasures. I'm lucky in that I seem to get a lot of surprises in the mail. Although, I should admit that one of the reasons I get surprises in the mail is because I am pretty good at Forgetting About Things. People who forget stuff generally get a lot of surprises.

Anyway I had completely forgotten about the American Chesterton Society's project of turning this magazine cover I illustrated for them:



into an actual 3-dimensional reality. So it was great to find this in the mail the other day:



I think the sculptor did a better job than I did. These great ornaments are available for purchase on the ACS Merchandise Page (They alo have a GKChesterton Frisbee).

And in other news: You may have noticed the title of this post was "The Merchandise: Part One. That's because I'm thinking of auctioning some of my recent artwork on e-bay in an effort to fund some ...costume-related activities. Hmm...

19 comments:

Internet Peasant said...

WHERE CAN WE GET ONE? That is the coolest thing that could ever happen, really. Having something you created becoming a Christmas ACTION FIGURE. Or ornament. Whatever you people are calling them these days.

Ben Hatke said...

Read the post, Chuckles. Follow the link to the American Chesterton Society webpage where you can purchase the ornaments for under $20.

Internet Peasant said...

Yeah, I don't really read much, you know. I just look at pictures.

Eric Orchard said...

Ha! This is great. Chesterton is one of my favorite writers. I'm reading the Father Brown stories right now.

Eric Orchard said...

My wife wants to get me one for my birthday!

Chris Chan said...

Not to nitpick, this is actually an important legal point. It's not a Chesterton "Frisbee," it's a "flying disk." "Frisbee" is a trademarked term and they are willing to sue the American Chesterton Society if they use the word.

On a side note, I love the ornament and plan on getting one soon.

Ben Hatke said...

They're seriously actually willing to sue?!? Woo. Frisbee's playing HARDBALL!

I just assumed that if Ben Hatke, who is not strictly speaking affilliated with the American Chesterton Society, referred to it as a frisbee then Frisbee-co or whoever wouldn't have much of a leg to stand on.

Like if they were offering Chesterton facial tissues and here on my blog I called them Chesterton Kleenex then Kleenex could maybe in some kind of Bizarro world sue me, but still even in Bizarro world they couldn't sue the Chesterton Society.

I'm just sayin.

Ben Hatke said...

Feel free to disagree. I think disagreements are what comboxes are all about.

Chris Chan said...

I think it has to be made absolutely clear that the organization marketing the product is not infringing on a brand name. If other people refer to the product by the copyrighted name, I think it's O.K.

It's not just "Frisbee." I worked at a candy store for ten summers, and we were not allowed to call our pecans covered in caramel and dipped in chocolate "Turtles," because Nestle patented the name "Turtles" (At least in regard to the candy. The animals with shells that move slowly can still go by that name.). We used to call them "Turtles," and then one day some Nestle lawyers actually SHOWED UP AT THE STORE and informed the owners that they had to cease and desist referring to those particular candies as "Turtles" or they'd sue. I don't know who informed Nestle about this. Maybe there's a group of spies who troll candy stores, looking for misused names. Anyway, we started calling our pecans-and-caramel-dipped-in -chocolate candies "Alligators." However, when we stuck those candies on a short wooden stick we could still refer to them as "Turtles on a Stick," because somehow the "On a Stick" was not a violation of copyright. Go figure.

Ben Hatke said...

I love stories like this! They show how insanely crazy people are! And the fact that they SHOWED UP? I'm sure the whole thing could have been handled by a telephone call -would that not have been intimidating enough? I don't think I could have been in that situation without either laughing uncontrollably or flying into a rage.

Somebody should look into whether or not Nestle gets any kind of kickback or royalties payment from actual living turtles.

Ben Hatke said...

By the way, thanks for commenting, Chris. I always hoped that my combox would have stories and discussion from people, but since my posts are never very ...edgy, or opinionated, there ends up being not a lot to say aside from
"that's a nice drawering."

Sarah said...

Andrew has been saying for ages that you should sell your stuff on ebay! He'll be very excited.

Ben Hatke said...

What? Really? Thanks for thowing me into indescision, Sarah. I had just decided not to do it!
Now I have to reconsider. I have one "clever" picture I was thinking of selling, but I also thought of getting a cafepress shop and having it printed on mugs and such.

I'll put the picture up here soon.

Really, I was going to do it so I could raise a little money to buy this really cool leather commedia/superhero style mask for my fire shows. It's a great mask.

Chris Chan said...

You're welcome. I'll try to comment more often.

Regarding the Nestle lawyers, the owner asked why they showed up, and they said that they get much better results when they actually come to the store.

Sarah said...

You should do it Ben. And only ever use your ebay money for fun stuff.

Anonymous said...

I just made my first ebay sale today. I sold a pair of pants to a guy in Sweden. Only I would have my first experience in ebay sales be to a guy in Sweden. I mean, really, Sweden?!!??

M.

Ben Hatke said...

Well, at least the guy has pants now.

WondrousPilgrim said...

ben: let us know if/when you sell stuff on e-bay, because I think it's awesome, and I totally will buy something!!! :)

Ben Hatke said...

Sure thing WP! My big problem was whether to offer them framed or not. Because I would have custom fromaing done and I was worried that it would make the prices too high. So i'm still hedging.